Willows Beach

This was our first Living Lab trip of the summer. We visited Willows Beach to learn about water testing, the intertidal zone, and the connection between stream and ocean.  We were also introduced to some of the history and cultural significance of the area by Songhees knowledge holders.

Learning about cultural significance of Willows beach on traditional Lekwungen Songhees territory, part of the eco-cultural curriculum and place-based learning with local high school students in the CRD. This trip was made possible by NSERC PromoScience and the Horner Foundation.
Before we looked at the biology of the beach, we had the opportunity to learn about the history and cultural importance of the surrounding Willows area.
Sampling intertidal biodiversity and identification in Willows Beach Oak Bay traditional Lekwungen territory with high school students, part of the eco-cultural curriculum and place-based learning with local high school students in the CRD. This trip was made possible by NSERC PromoScience and the Horner Foundation.
With identification sheets in our hands and smiles on our faces, we set out to the intertidal shore to see what kind of marine life we could find, and learn about the rich cultural history and land use by the Songhees Nation.
Ecological and biological learning through water quality testing at Willow's beach in Oak Bay, part of Living Labs ecocultural focus. This is also part of the eco-cultural curriculum and place-based learning with local high school students in the CRD. This trip was made possible by NSERC PromoScience and the Horner Foundation.
Two brave high school students tested the chilly water of Willows beach as part of the trip’s eco-cultural learning and water quality segment.
Eco-cultural learning and biological and cultural significance in the intertidal biodiversity of Willows beach in Oak Bay (CRD). This trip is part of the eco-cultural curriculum and place-based learning with local high school students in the CRD. This trip was made possible by NSERC PromoScience and the Horner Foundation.
Despite the rain, we were excited to sea the life beneath the waves at Willows beach! Here’s a few of the fantastic students on our trip sampling intertidal biodiversity at this culturally-significant site.
Land-use and ecocultural significance learning from Songhees knowledge-keepers and UVic biology department, part of the eco-cultural curriculum and place-based learning with local high school students in the CRD. This trip was made possible by NSERC PromoScience and the Horner Foundation.
While exploring the beach, we had a chance to learn from both our Living Lab coordinators and Songhees Nation knowledge-keepers about historical land-use changes, and why ecological protection is vital to preserve its eco-cultural significance
Exploring intertidal biodiversity with Oak Bay high school students on traditional Lekwungen territory. Ecocultural learning at Willows beach with Living Lab, part of the eco-cultural curriculum and place-based learning with local high school students in the CRD. This trip was made possible by University of Victoria science professors and post-secondary students, in addition to NSERC PromoScience and the Horner Foundation.
Tide pools are an integral part of the intertidal ecosystem. Armed with identification cards, students explored these biodiverse pockets along the Willows beach shoreline

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